Viable Electric Vehicle Charging Facility Planning Models for Asian Cities with High Population Density


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SPEAKER:

Professor Qiang Meng

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

National University of Singapore


DATE & TIME: 29 March 2022 (Tuesday), 19:00 – 20:00 (Hong Kong Time)


ORGANISED BY:

Institute of Transport Studies, The University of Hong Kong


HOSTS:

Professor Becky P.Y. Loo (Director) and Professor W.Y. Szeto (Deputy Director), The University of Hong Kong


ABSTRACT:

As a clean transportation means, the electric vehicle (EV) has received increasing interest from different stakeholders. However, it is a challenge for an Asian city with high population density such as Singapore and Hong Kong to well plan the EV charging infrastructure due to the dense and tall residential buildings, limited driving range of EVs, and taxi services. Therefore, it is imperative to develop variable EV charging facility planning models for the Asian dense cities.

In this study, a four-step model is developed to deploy normal and fast-charging stations that can satisfy the charging demand of private EVs, 1-shift, and 2-shift electric taxis. To further consider charging service for electric taxis, a fast-charging facility planning model is formulated based on the taxi trajectory data subject to EV battery degradation and vehicle heterogeneity in driving range. A case study in Singapore is thoroughly conducted, and insightful policy implications are revealed: policy-makers could use the proposed methodology to significantly save investment and reduce total waiting time for charging; overlooking battery degradation and vehicle heterogeneity will yield a biased electric taxi charging facility planning.


ABOUT THE SPEAKER:

Prof. Qiang Meng is a Prof. in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE) at the National University of Singapore (NUS), the co-director of LTA-NUS Transportation Centre, and the director of the Centre for Transportation Research of CEE. His research mainly focuses on urban mobility modeling and optimization, shipping and intermodal freight transportation analysis, and quantitative risk assessment of transport operations. He has published more than 230 journal articles with total citations of 13,579 and an H-index of 68 in Google Scholar.

Prof. Meng is now the Co-Editor-in-Chief of Transportation Research Part E and Multimodal Transportation (a new transportation journal launched by the Southeast University of China and Elsevier), and Associate Editor of Transportation Research Part B.

Prof. Meng has clinched many research awards and prizes, including the best paper award for institutional innovation in the 14th EASTS International Conference in 2021, 2020 TSL (Transportation Science & Logistics Society of INFORMS) Best Paper Award in Freight Transportation and Logistics, OCDI Takeuchi Yoshio Best Paper Award in the Field of Logistics in the 13th EASTS International Conference in 2019, Engineer Research Award of Faculty of Engineering at NUS in 2018, Chang Jiang Scholars Chair Professorship awarded by the Ministry of Education of PR China in 2017, Dean’s Chair in Faculty of Engineering at NUS in 2015, and the 13th World Conference on Transportation Research Society Prize for the best paper in 2013.


ABOUT THE INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORT STUDIES AT THE UNIVERSITY OF HONG KONG:

The Institute of Transport Studies, HKU was established in 2003. It is a university centre that seeks to identify research programmes as mission-oriented activities and not by traditional academic disciplines alone. As an exemplary interdisciplinary research group, the Institute is having 29 Institute Fellows, all being academic staff at the Professional level, from the Faculty of Architecture, Faculty of Business and Economics, Faculty of Engineering, Faculty of Law, Faculty of Social Sciences, and Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine. Apart from hosting the Distinguished Transport Lecture series, international workshops and other seminars, the Institute has co-organized the International Conference on Smart Mobility and Logistics in Future Cities with the Chartered Institute of Transport and Logistics in Hong Kong and the Transport Department of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region.

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Placemaking Sandbox for Transport Practitioners

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This seminar will be via ZOOM only.


SPEAKER:

Dr Iderlina Mateo-Babiano Senior Lecturer in Urban Planning, Melbourne School of Design, University of Melbourne


DATE & TIME:

December 6 (Monday) 13:00-14:00pm HK time (16:00-17:00pm Melbourne time)


ABSTRACT:

Cities are changing very rapidly. Vibrant public spaces make for inclusive, engaging and resilient cities. Strategies and methods traditionally implemented to better manage public spaces, including our public transport environments, may no longer be appropriate to address these unpredictable transformations. In this presentation, I will introduce the Placemaking Sandbox program as a way of fostering a greater understanding of “placemaking” within and outside of transport environments --- the walking, waiting and riding environments --- and the benefit of providing a “sandbox” environment to design and test council-supported, community-led initiatives before and as they are implemented in our cities and communities.


ABOUT THE SPEAKER:

Iderlina Mateo-Babiano, PhD, is Senior Lecturer in Urban Planning at the University of Melbourne. She is also Assistant Dean, Diversity and Inclusion. An architect, urban planner and transport planner by training, she teaches Urban Design and Place Making for The Built Environment. Her research is concerned with improving our understanding of how people interact with place, creating unique challenges and opportunities for positive place-based change. She has also advanced a significant body of knowledge in streets as places, active transport, gender and transport, with theory and policy implications within the Australasian setting.


HOST:

Professor Becky P.Y. Loo, Director, Institute of Transport Studies


ORGANIZER:

Institute of Transport Studies, The University of Hong Kong


REGISTRATION:

Registration link: https://www.institute-of-transport-studies.hku.hk/event-details/itsseminar20211206/form

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Email to hkits@hku.hk

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Walkable for Whom: Health, Social Justice, and Equity Impacts of the Built and Natural Environment

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Registration link: https://www.institute-of-transport-studies.hku.hk/event-details/dtls20211118/form

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Email to hkits@hku.hk

Confirmation emails with ZOOM link will be sent to participants.


SPEAKER:

Professor Lawrence D. Frank, Ph.D., CIP

Professor, Urban Studies and Planning @ UC San Diego

President, Urban Design 4 Health, Inc.


DATE & TIME: 18 November 2021 (Thu), 14:00 – 15:00 (Hong Kong Time) /

17 November 2021 (Wed), 22:00 – 23:00 (Pacific Standard Time)


This Distinguished Transport Lecture will be held on ZOOM.


ABSTRACT:

Compact walkable environments with greenspace can support active travel and reduce GHG emissions. Recent evidence suggests reduced risk of diabetes and heart disease in more walkable environments. Both built and natural environments may be a factor influencing health and GHG emissions. However, considerably different relationships between health outcomes and walkability exist across income and ethnicity. Disadvantaged are often located in fairly central dense urban environments creating confusing over the convergence of walkability and public health concerns. More at risk populations are often located in places with increased exposure to air pollution and noise, while also lacking in access to greenspace.


Density and proximity are core tenets of walkability which increases exposure and impact of other characteristics of the surrounding environment. For the wealthy this often means access to greenspace, shops, services, and entertainment options while for the poor it means air pollution, noise, and risk of injury or crime. Disadvantaged populations are more likely to develop chronic disease and also more likely to be at risk of mortality from COVID-19. Several policy directives including Justice 40 within the USA and other initiatives from the WHO have been spurred by the pandemic. This presentation will discuss the causal pathway and available evidence linking the physical environment with chronic and infectious disease; and how this pathway diverges for the “haves” versus “have nots.”


From an equity and social justice perspective, it is becoming essential to provide a more complete and effective definition of what constitutes a healthy environment and for whom.


ABOUT THE SPEAKER:

Dr. Frank specializes in the interaction between land use, travel behavior, air quality and health; and in the energy use and climate change impacts of urban form policies. He is a “walkability pioneer” and was among the very first to quantify connections between built environment, active transportation, and health. He began using the term “walkability” in the early 90’s and his work led to WalkScore and has been cited over 40,000 times. He has been listed in Thompson and Reuter’s top 1% in the social sciences and is the #1 top ranked planning academic in North America according to a recent Google Scholar ranking. Dr. Frank has published over 200 peer reviewed articles and reports and co-authored Heath and Community Design and Urban Sprawl and Public Health nearly 2 decades ago that mapped out the field emerging at the nexus between built and natural environments and health.


ORGANISED BY:

Institute of Transport Studies, The University of Hong Kong

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